Nov
15


Two decades after Béla Bartok’s death, Hungarians found themsleves resisting Soviet attempts to obliterate their music. Following in Bartok’s footsteps, ethnomusicologists and musicians started secret forays into Hungarian enclaves in Transylvania, where the Ceauşescu regime’s neglect had -ironically- preserved the folk culture. Thus was born the táncház movement, wherein the young people of the time learned the music and dances of a Magyar heritage that had been forbidden to them. The opening night at WOMEX 2011 in Copenhagen was called “Hungarian Heartbeats”and showcased excellent and varied bands and soloists. Tükrös provided the táncház element. They even brought along two excellent dancers ( Kádár Ignác and Baranyai Barbara) after all, tanchaz IS dance music, so watch for some fancy footwork in the second half of this video.
Tükrös is: Péter Arandás – viola, Attila Halmos –violin, Gergely Koncz – violin, András Lelkes -double bass, and Endre Liber on viola.



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Michal
Welcome!

Here’s where you’ll find my weekly original world music video blogs that appear on Huffington Post, as well as an archive starting in April of 2009.

This is also the place where you will find video that is exclusive to my site. I’ve traveled to places like Uzbekistan, Morocco, and Taiwan and no matter where I go I have found amazingly talented and creative people working in every genre from the deepest traditions to the cutting edge.

It’s been incredibly rewarding to interview them and to capture some of what they do on video. Enjoy what you see and hear, and let me know what you think. I welcome your feedback.

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